The Wild Pig (Sus scrofa) Behavior – A Retrospective Study

Wild pigs are very intelligent and secretive. These animals are adaptive ecological generalists, capable of exploiting a wide variety of geographic locations, habitats and forage resources further observed that wild pigs were more difficult to study than other ungulates because of their “intelligence, shyness and vigilance combined with an acute sense of smell and hearing”. These animals are a forgotten link in Conflict, Crisis and Conservation and are often overlooked but the universal damage they cause is immense. It is just an outlook that we are starring at a catastrophe the wild pigs.

Wild Pig (Sus scrofa) Behavior

In spite of these challenges, the basis for documenting and understanding the wild pig behavior has evolved dramatically, contributing significantly to our understanding of these animals. In general, however, the lack of intensive field studies was attributed to the fact that wild pigs were regarded everywhere as a pest and were therefore despised, ending in tragic outcomes like poisoning, hunting in way to end up the conflict. This drove these animals to adopt a nocturnal activity pattern and frequently seek shelter in heavy, dense cover, making behavioral studies difficult if not impossible to conduct. In spite of those challenges, a number of behavioral studies of freeranging wild pigs have been completed since that time.

The purpose of this paper is to provide a precise overview of wild pig behavior. Several topical areas are focused on and addressed in this paper, with the intention of providing a basis for understanding wild pig behavior within the context of better managing these animals in control scenarios. Some behavioral variation does exist among the wild pigs of the three regions (Agricultural areas adjoining Mudumalai, Anaimalai, and Sathyamangalam) of study; however these will be treated as one in the following sections unless otherwise specified.

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